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20121031
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and local governments are already coordinating the cleanup. right now, thousands of workers from every level of government are on a rescue mission in new jersey and new york's hardest- hit areas. fema is pulling in generators and working with power companies to get the lights back on. the storm's damage was so severe that president obama quickly declared major disasters in new york and new jersey overnight. the decision frees up federal dollars to help families and businesses recover their losses. it also allows the u.s. to reimburse local and state governments for some of the expenses they'll face as they rebuild. the east coast may be cleaning up, but sandy isn't finished. the storm is plowing inland, dumping snow across the appalachians. with sandy still churning, it's nearly impossible to know how extensive the damage will be or how long the cleanup will last. sylvia hall, nbr, washington. >> tom: earlier, susie mentioned the challenges of getting around one of the world's largest and most congested cities with no public transportation. city buses began rolling on new york streets at 5:0
-- not only taxes, but there are over 100 local bond issues in california this year and dozens of local tax measures. if they feel like they are getting squeezed economically, i think they'll be less inclined to vote for taxes at the state level and at the local level and bonds. and i think that's where it could come out and bite. >> dan, i want to ask you this. what about the demeanor of the man? is he thinking about the potential of losing this? he must be thinking about that and what's that doing to his demeanor and his whole attitude to this thing? he's going to prop 30. is he prepared to not win it? >> i suppose he is. he says he is. he says he's -- he'll follow the will of the people. i think the jerry brown that's here now is different in many ways than the jerry brown i saw 30, 35 years ago when we were both much younger. he is much more -- i don't think he's changed inside very much. but i think his demeanor has changed and i think he's much more cautious, less willing to go out on a limb, very kind of, almost risk averse in many respects. and that's kind of a new jerry brown and i
company. i also get all my text books for free. it means i don't have to buy anything from a local provider. it means the education i'm getting isn't subject to the local nation. >> rose: and maybe you can educate yourself as a matter of fact you want to. >> i i was 14 before i could study a foreign language. i could choose spanish or french. i came from the richest nation on earth. now, imagine if you're four years old and have the choice of 100 languages and you don't have to ask your parents' permission, the mayor's permirkz the local religious leader's position, or the president of the country's permission. now you're endeathering and unleashing the power of humanity to an extent we are never seen. >> rose: some of the concliewgs of your book, the destruction of paper. , new kinds of cash, new kinds of transactions. what do you mean by that? >> i can create a key and put it on my phone and then i can use my phone to open a door. but that's the most basic thing that happens. as soon as the key becomes a piece of software, i can flip the key to 20 people. then i can create a key
by senate the refinery in malaysia. but a group of activists and local residents are against that move. we have this report from malaysia. kayaker from rainforest to refineries, but at what cost? too high, shop these activists. they are fighting plans to open an australian refinery for rare earth minerals pit nearby. gendarme the court is still blocking the project. the government says it has been thoroughly scrutinized and will be stay. hobbies as 17 elements are found in many places. p.j. get these 17 elements are found in many places but all are only refight in china, a messy, polluted prospect. the australian company line s hopes this, largest growers plant outside china will break that monopoly. -- largest rare earth plant outside china. could need up to one-third of a man outside china these essential minerals. the company says it has passed every test every environmental question put to it and it is making the case for two years, yet it has gained very little traction with a local population that simply does not trust the country or malaysian authorities are supposed to regulate it.
to school. >> today is a lesson in the local language. in one fifth of afghan women can read or write, but that is a big improvement from a decade ago. the schools in remote areas are helping. there is a big turnout for the launch of this government school. 3 million afghan girls are getting some education. it still leaves 2 million that have never been the class. but attitudes are changing. >> hi bring the women of afghanistan up to the level, the owner of the future. and they are the owner of all that is happening. >> it is a new era for these girls. now learning to play cricket. they have had to stay at home if the taliban were still in power. curious about me and keen to talk, but outside, they face many restrictions and uncertainty about their future after nato forces pull out. this is one example of the progress has been getting a high school in the past 10 years, but in the rural and less secure areas, there are millions that are not getting any kind of education and are under pressure to get married while still a school age. it is tough being a girl in afghanistan, but they ar
with the local law enforcement and local government. the local government is going, what is going on here? vegas was part of nevada and utah were mormon. the center of power used to be in salt lake city. it is still, to a degree. it was frowned upon. there was gambling and prostitution down there. with all this money, i think the folks up there when, hey, we should get our hands around this and get control of the situation. it made for strange bedfellows. really odd marriages of really different cultures in a way that we had not seen before. tavis: what are you learning so far about walking in the shoes of a wise guy, trying to go good? >> is really an interesting perspective. let's -- try to divorce yourself from me for a moment. this is part of my process. reading, talking to individuals, taking in information from whatever quarter i can find it. the attitude is, not speaking for myself, what separates me from law enforcement? nothing. they are just the people with the badges. they do things that are as corrupt and more corrupt than me. they are fighting for theirs. i am here so that i can get
in the swing state of colorado. she spoke to a local businessman about -- businesswoman about the issues. >> how have the last four years been for you? >> it has been stressful. it has been a blessing, obviously. >> would you have liked more help as a small-business owner? gregg's absolutely. when the economy tanks, -- >> absolutely. ed, thingsconomy tanks got tight. i build this business. my plan was not helped by the economic situation. >> you are trying to encourage every business owner to employ just one extra person. >> jefferson county has an initiative, just add one. it is for stakeholders like myself, business owners, and we come together and say, let's put together a strategic plan to put people back to work. jefferson county has 20 douses bob businesses. our objective is that if we can get 5% of this area to hire one person, that is a lot of jobs. i think we have a certain group of folks that really understand how bad off we were when president obama took office. then we have the other based on emotion. and they have probably always voted for one party and probably always going
is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials and we will not quit until this is done. and the directive i have given-- and i said this yesterday but i will repeat and i think craig and others who are working with me right now know i mean it-- we are not going to tolerate red tape, we're not going to tolerate bureaucracy. >> woodruff: meanwhile, republican mitt romney returned to the campaign trail today with three events in florida. the g.o.p. presidential nominee also mentioned the ongoing recovery in the northeast. >> this is... this is quite a time for the country, as you know. we're... we're going through trauma in a major part of the country, a kind of trauma you've experienced here in florida more than once. and... and it's interesting to see how people come togetr in a circumstance like this. we've seen folks from all over the country step forward and... and offer contributions. >> woodruff: bumps in the recovery were evident in new york city late today, where the public, bellevue hospital , started evacuating about 500 patients
to continue to monitor the situation in your local community, listen to state and local officials. >> woodruff: the warning included especially pennsylvania where the rain kept falling and flood waters kept rising today. and where the storm already passed, clean-up was the order of the day with first light utility crews from across the country began working to restore power to millions of people. >> we're really lucky to have, you know, everybody safe and have the crews already here getting us fixed up. >> woodruff: in parts of appalachia, the problem was snow. the hurricane dumped up to a foot of it after merging with a cold front catching some people off guard. >> i wasn't ready for it either. woodruff: meanwhile in the midwest, the storm's power stretched all the way to chicago as waves crashed along the shores of lake michigan. the windy city also got gusts up to 60 miles an hour especially challenging for cyclists like this one. >> it's really tough going north. it's very usey going south. you don't even have to pedal. >> woodruff: those same conditions were feltarts of michigan and wisco
entities. associating yourself with political causes is much more controversial than giving to the local hospital. >> ryssdal: conservative political causes have been in his blood for a long time. bopp got his start with the right-to-life movement in the 1970s. and he says he quickly learned an important lesson-- campaign finance laws were keeping conservative groups from getting their message out. >> so, to defend them and to make sure that they can be effective means opposing those laws. >> ryssdal: over the past 30 years, jim bopp has challenged more than 150 campaign finance laws. he's won some of the biggest cases in the country. >> campaign finance laws don't do anything for citizens, other than stifle and limit them. the average voter could care less who's, quote, "funding" a politician or... >> ryssdal: really? >> ...or a... of course. >> ryssdal: do you think people should care about where this money's coming from? >> generally no, because it's the message. you know, you either buy the argument or don't buy the argument. generally no, it doesn't matter. truth doesn't change beca
passed by a local delegation. you go to the local primaries and we go to the national convention. it is the buttons, the posters, the signs, the funny hats people wear. what we are trying to do is to collect the entire of sent through these material options. bring this back to washington, there is a cataloging process which will ultimately lead to a digitized record. >> we exist to document culture and this is part of that. it is that materiality that we are trying to gather. it has to have dimension to it. >> i feel that is important to understand history in order to understand the president. history does have a way of repeating itself and in america, it repeats itself every four years. if you have an understanding of tricks, techniques that have been used, you can understand what is going on now. >> that brings today's show to a close. for all of us here at world news america, thank you for watching and come back tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont
with hamas. a source within the palestinian group says a truce will begin midnight local time 13 days to go until the u.s. chooses the next president. each side is trying to get an all-important women's vote. what is driving their decision? steve kingston went to denver, colorado to find out. >> the breathtaking fall splendor of the rocky mountains. in his foothills sit the mile high city. the beating heart of a critical swing states, a state where women voters outnumber men by more than 100,000. >> my name is rebecca. i am a single mother with three teenage children. >> i am catherine. my husband is working two jobs while i stay home and take care of my 2-year-old daughter, charlotte. >> women on a budget come to this giant retailer for a no- frills convenience. the cards are used to have a corporate job. the right after she was born i was laid off we went from having a lot of money to not nearly as much money. >> bill clinton famous huizar -- famously targets of bombs. sarah palin rallied hockey mom spirit of the 2012 variation on that group could decide the outcome. that is because in el
, not in minnesota. but today the president gave a series of interviews to local tv stations and about who he talked to -- iowa, wisconsin, north carolina, florida, eff last one of them battle ground states. romney has been campaigning in iowa, this weekend in virginia if the storm doesn't knock him off, in florida and wisconsin. this is what it's all boiled down to, molly. >> absolutely. you see them both doing this marathon campaigning now, this frenzy, going to three states a day, from stop to stop on the plane. you've got to imagine they're just exhausted but it's a very narrow group of states. they're really not venturing outside it. i don't think anyone thinks new states are going to come onto the board at this late stage. there was a little bit of chatter today about minnesota, both candidates putting a little bit of money into media markets in minute machine and the speculation is, is this just the ads that bleed into wisconsin? gwen: it's -- let's do a little three dimensional chat it. it's not just about the campaign, james, about leadership and trust. it's also about a more narrow specifi
one. you only have to go as far as your local goodwill for some job training services. just last year, more than 3.5 million people reached out to goodwill industries international for help with job training and placement. sylvia hall continues our look at job retraining. when you think of goodwill, you may think of a store like this. what you may not know is that the money made here goes back to other programs, including job training and placement initiatives. and just last year, they helped nearly 190,000 people find work. baltimore resident michelle brown wants to be included in this year's number. she's been taking job readiness classes at a local goodwill center as part of a welfare-to- work program. >> we learn how to do our resume, we learn how to act on interviews, we learn how to ask questions to certain employers, we learn how to do cover letters, we learn how to just basically find a job the right way. >> reporter: she's joining millions of people who have sought services from goodwill. since the recession began, goodwill has seen a flood of people seeking job training serv
of their dollars from local property tax revenues. after proposition 13 passed, local property tax revenues in the state fell by over 50%. >> in response, voters passed prop 98 in 1988, which guaranteed a minimum funding level for k through 12 education. today, schools get more than half their revenue from the state, with the rest coming from the federal government, property taxes and fees and other local revenue. but it hasn't completely worked, according to the california budget project's jonathan caplan. >> because the state provides a large portion of its budget to schools, when the state experiences revenue shortfalls, when the state goes through a budget crisis as we've been experiencing, what that means is that schools are going to be in the cross hairs. >> the result? schools that once were tops in the nation are no longer. >> california ranks dead last when it comes to the number of students per teacher. it also ranks dead last when it comes to the number of students per counselor. >> one national study now ranks california schools overall p performance 30th in the nation and it co
armstrong of rocky mount. now he hosts a local tv show on politics. he helped start a tea party branch here in 2010. what are the biggest issues? >> jobs, jobs and jobs. that would be your top three >> brown: that's it. so it's a question of who can do the better scrob >> who can do the better job not creating jobs. we realize politicians don't create job but at least enhancing the environment that can create jobs. >> brown: do you think there's much enthusiasm? >> as a conservative i am much more enthusiastic about mitt romney than i was john mccain. i thought john mccain was just an extension of george bush. we had had enough of that. >> brown: but polls show enthusiasm remains a question mark here for mitt romney and for the president. he also has to worry about criticism from his left. people like duke economics professor william garretty who cites the almost one in five blacks out of work here and says the president simply hasn't done enough to help. >> that's pretty staggering actually. i mean, we're approaching the kinds of unemployment rates that existed in the united states at the
and that approach toward whatever it is that they really care about locally or globally. >> rose: joseph stiglitz and chelsea clinton when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the followingal additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: the debate over the widening economic divide there this country has intensified it helped spark the occupy wall street movement one year ago and has also been a key issue the presidential campaign as the economy continues to falter. >> this country doesn't succeed when only the rich get richer. we succeed when the middle class gets bigger. >> rose: joseph stiglitz is a nobel prize winning economist. in his new book the price of inequality, how today's divided society endangers our future. he argues that a wealthy minority in this country has fed a vicious circle of growing inequality. i'm pleased to have joe stiglitz back at this table. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> rose: where do you think the american economy is today
yesterday on a local radio station. the judge dismissed that as an unbelievable conspiracy theory. and he talked about the damage that this case has done to the... to individuals, the loss of innocence and to a loss of community. and that those factored into his thinking in crafting the sentence that he imposed. >> woodruff: and as he was saying this, what was sandusky doing? >> sandusky during... i mean, he was watching whoever was speaking. when the prosecutor was talking, he was sort of... i mean, i guess he was... it would be fairly described as a smirk. but when the young men were speaking, he was more of a smile. i mean, he was engaged but at one point when his own lawyer was talking he was chewing his fingernails. but besides that, i wouldn't say that he was, you know, giving a lot of emotion. there wasn't a lot to read there in terms of body language. >> woodruff: i read that the judge said that, as he was crafting the sentence, he kept in mind one of the victims in the shower who was seen by a janitor. do we know any more about that? >> yeah. that victim 8 as he's known, that's a
in hospital. she was just 51 and used to sell sweets on the steps of a local church. poor families like this one made an impression on the mayor back in 2005. >> i was running for mayor, and one day, i encountered a little kid crying in front of his door of his house. and i went to him and asked him, "what happened?" "my mother left me." i asked the neighbor what was going on. he told me is that she took her television set to a pawn shop in order to get some money to put his father to rest and get the coffin, get the things. and then, i said, "this is something that is happening every day in the capital. we have to do something about it." and that day, i started promoting that if i became mayor, we would have funeral homes in order to give dignity to the poorest people of the city. [indistinct talking] >> and in a culture where community ties are strong, that may mean taking everything needed for a wake into one of the poor barrios of tegucigalpa. with an empty coffin on board, the pickup heads off to the morgue to collect the body of a young gunshot victim. we joined them later as his
cillessen, a local teacher. lisa and her husband jeremiah, the parents of three children, say they are even more pro-obama than four years ago. >> what changed for me was when i actually started working on the campaign and really, really started digging into some of the things that have been accomplished in the past four years. this is still the right leader for our country and we still need to keep moving this direction. >> ifill: jeremiah is a classic jeffco voter-- a registered republican who is crossing party lines to support mr. obama. but he also believes the president fell short in last week's debate. >> i think he really has to lock in on the undecided voters and that's first going to be one, particularly in this county. and i think there is an overwhelming number who after the first debate shifted a little bit. they're looking for somebody they can trust and somebody they can believe in. and in the first debate romney appeared to be that candidate. >> we have to get to these doors. this is the difference between winning and losing. >> ifill: both campaigns are stepping up their gam
. where this really has an impact is local but also on state emissions. california has all kinds of stuff on the balanced, because if you have got more money than your opponent, you could win. tavis: joe biden has apparently written a tell-all, and i am told it is not a flattering picture he paints of the vice president. i do not know if that would have any impact. the question is what kind of nose itches -- what kind of buzz is generated. it >> if an idealistic young american comes to washington to change things, but washington changes him. in the process of explaining his story, he takes after his former boss, joe biden, and portrays joe biden in a negative light. it is also a scathing indictment of how washington politics works and how both parties will relate to the business community who. this gentleman also places a pretty broad indictment on both parties in terms of how they .elate to wall street triggere tavis: will the republicans hold onto the house? i was just in my home state of indiana, and mr. murdoch has put his foot in his mouth again, and that is a tight race, but will th
and local level? >> hispanics are not monolithic, and when you look at florida, you have a cuban-american community that has historically been very republican. i think people are interested and want to report hispanic candidates, they are good. if marco rubio had had a pro in negation reform position, he would be the candidate, but since he does not, he was not chosen. eventually, i think the more sober voices will have more weight. tavis: what you think is the future of marco rubio? he did not win the hispanic vote. what is your read on his future? >> he is an intelligent man. he is quite articulate. does he play in florida? i am not sure. does he play in taxes, i am not sure. marco rubio is seen in some ways of being the latino face of a party that is very harsh to latinos. >> the democratic mayor acquitted himself quite nicely. what is his future? >> he is probably the biggest star they have the right now. he is a very smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot of other latino politicians. he is completely american in his point of view. i think it will pass
're looking to source locally, correct? >> correct. >> reporter: how difficult is it to do that? it sounds very expensive. >> you have to look at the etymology, the beginning of trends, and when the consumer starts to change-- and all of the pressure is on locally grown. they don't want as many preservatives, they don't want chemicals, they don't want things of this nature, the marketplace will follow. funny thing about the marketplace-- it follows consumers, and we believe we are. >> reporter: you have rolled out in costco in california. will you be rolling your food out at all costco stores? >> that is the plan. can i announce something to you? we have not announced it directly, but we are now national in retail. you can now go on lyfe kitchen, "lyfe"-- "love your food everyday"-- and go on amazon.com and get your food delivered to your house. >> reporter: what did you learn at mcdonald's that you are applying to this business? >> we learned a little bit about taste. you know, it's got to taste good, number one. number two, we learned you got to serve a lot of people quickly. we have a c
, federal, and local governments. and so we're confident that the assets are prepositioned for an effective response in the aftermath of the storm. r david paulison knows about mobilizing the federal government's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacting several states from dc all the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of expenses will be more than that. but yes, it's enough for now. what the president has done, the president has d
the interest of scouting. >> sreenivasan: so how widespread was this type of bearing or collusion with local leaders? >> the maddening thing about these files is that we don't know ultimately. there are ott a lot of them that were destroyed by the scouts in 1975. more of them would go away when scouts turned 75 or died. so for us, the issue is we found individual cases where it happened and we probably found 15 or 20 different cases. then we also take into account that local scout masters are also local officials. so by that measure it's countless. >> sreenivasan: let's talk about that. how do we calculate the number of people affected? you have a finite number of individuals, allegedly perpetrators of this. but what about the victims? >> the tabulation of the victims hasn't been done and part of the issue now is their names have been redactd from the files. so anyone looking to go back and tabulate that is going to have the problem that they won't have different names of victims so you don't know exsfrept the context if it's one person or five people or ten people. so it's impossible to tel
. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we look at what state and local officials have done to prepare and examine why the storm is so large and dangerous. >> ifill: then, we turn to the presidential race, as the weather forces both candidates to cancel dozens of campaign stops. we get analysis from susan page and dan balz. >> woodruff: the political campaigns know more about you than you think. we have the first of two reports from hari sreenivasan on efforts to track voters online. >> this could be the year that digital strategies decide what is shaping up to be a razor-close election, but who is watching us and how much do they know about us? >> ifill: jeffrey brown talks with author bill ivey about his prescription for remaking america's democracy. >> well, i think what we need is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's kqed profiles a photographer who uses google's street view images to create art. >> you have this distinct f
for the men who are fighting for the white house it's a state to suck up to, whether it's buying the local produce. >> i'm thinking we are going to be eating some corn over the weekend. >> or urging minors to phone a friend. >> want you to find one person to convince to vote for our ticket. >> both candidates are well aware in the last election in the last 44 years ohio has voted for the winning candidate so the politicians woo voters. >> we can create one million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years with the right policies. that's what i'm fighting for. that's why i'm running for a second term as president. that's what's going to be important to ohio. >> his plan is to continue what he's done before, the status quo has not worked. we cannot afford four more years of barack obama. we're not going to have four more years of barack obama. >> the road to the white house runs through ohio, that's why the candidates have made more than 30 visits here already. the fact is that in this huge country, the election will be decided in just a few places like this. this is the most expensive p
, there is going to be at some local, i do not know how pronounced this will be, but i suspect there will be a real debate about the proper role of government. i hope we can have a head on a conversation about that. i would love to see just an explicit, direct question put to both of them about what role of government is as they see it. because that is what undergirds this entire debate is how we see the role of government. so romney gets caught on this 47% videos saying, in fact, that there are too many americans who feel entitled to health care, to food, and to housing. they feel entitled to health care, food, and housing. i ask you a direct question. are americans entitled to those three things? >> a good society insures those things for its citizens. and that helps make its citizenry healthy, productive, active and dynamic. and the countries that are successful in this world right now, the country with low unemployment, with the lack of priority, with the skills and the ability to compete internationally, the countries like sweden or germany or the netherlands or denmark or norway, they do not
. for over three weeks now, these miners, supported by the local community, have been demanding a wage increase. the illegal strikes continue. today, one person was killed, but it is not clear why and by whom. it seems the shooting of 34-5 -- since the shooting of 34 miners, the security forces have maintain heavy forces. consequently, there's still a deep sense of mistrust between the strikers who continue to carry their traditional weapons and the police. in some instances, the tension escalates to near breaking point. the police are determined not to have a repeat of what happened. they disarmed the minors whenever an opportunity presents itself. they say the strike has cost them 39 ounces of platinum in production. south africans are hoping that these strikes will come to an end soon. the country is desperately in need of the nelson mandela magic of peace and reconciliation. >> as we have been reporting, the u.s. unemployment rate has fallen below 8% for the first time in almost four years. it is an encouraging sign, especially for middle-class families struggling to make ends meet
revolution. it was a high-risk strategy. near the launch site, locals recollect the days. >> if something had gone wrong, it was all over. these were two huge powers are to the teeth. it was serious. >> no more so when a u.s. plane was shot down near cuba. two years -- two days later it was removed. in return, president kennedy pledged not to invade cuba. >> we emerged stronger. we had won another battle. the americans did not invade. we are just a little island. if they are the most powerful country in the world, but we are still here. >> but it could so easily have ended otherwise. bbc news, havana. >> you can follow all the actions at the second presidential date on our web site. from all this year, thank you for watching. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. at union brink, -- at union bank, our finance a manager's guide you. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? by kcet los angeles. - hi, neighbour! we have a potty at school.
.s. military and the locals campaigning for american bases to be removed from the island. lance armstrong was once regarded as a miracle man. not only did he win a record- breaking seven titles, he overcame cancer. the week after damning allegations were published against them, he was stripped of his car sponsorship deal with nike. he has announced that he is stepping down as chairman of his cancer charity. >> accused of being edgy, a starstruck career in danger of disintegrating. the scandal engulfing the champion gets bigger. his long-standing sponsored doesn't want to be associated with lance armstrong anymore. more than 1000 pages by the u.s. anti-doping agency, too strong to be ignored. despite constant in the aisles of wrongdoing. the announcement was made within minutes of another stunning revelation. he stepped down as chairman of the cancer charity he founded. live strong has raised hundreds of millions of dollars fighting the disease with them as its figurehead. in his first public statement since the release of the report, he said he had to distance himself from the foundation
is tainted, a disgusting cocktail locals say is too politic to use. >> all along the river, abandoned factories. the polluted water from those places release mouse. >> china's next generation are about to take power here. they face two problems. how to keep the economy growing and also tackle rising discontent and the damage that has been done to the environment. a few weeks ago, a right police battled crowds. -- riot police battled crowds. there were furious about plans for a cooper factory -- copper factory. the billion-pound project would have brought many jobs, but it was not wanted. >> of course, health is more important than jobs. it matters for our children. if we are sick, how can we keep supporting them? >> china's next leaders are inheriting a toxic legacy. they have plans for cleaner gross, but that will be slow and expensive. -- clean air growth, but that will be slow and expensive. the waste stains the ground yellow. chinese call these places cancer villages. there are dozens of them were cancer rates have soared for reasons not cleared. his mother is 47. three vix ago, d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)